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Pest List

Trees and Shrubs Pests Fruits and Vegetables Pests Lawn and Turf Pests Common Outdoor Pests
 

Pest

   

Symptoms/Detection

   

Diagnosis/Control

California Oakworm

	California Oakworm
    Creamy white egg masses are easily observed on lower leaf surfaces in February and March. Larvae are readily apparent, as is the foliar damage caused by their feeding     Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Cicada

	Cicada
    The presence of large number of pupae sacks hanging down from tree branches. Large, dark insects in trees emitting a loud buzzing or clacking sound. Under close scrutiny, some very small twigs are noticeably split or splintered where eggs have been laid.     Band trees with a sticky substance called "tanglefoot" to trap larvae as they crawl up the tree trunk to pupae. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Bagworm

	Bagworm
    Foliage looks stripped and ragged. Appearance of spindle-shaped bags hanging downward from leaves and branches.     Physically remove bags from trees during the winter. Be sure to completely destroy worms inside the bags. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Eastern Tent Caterpillar

	Eastern Tent Caterpillar
    The presence of large, silky white webs built in the crouches of tree branches during early spring. Branches may be stripped of leaves within several feet of webs. Dark, hairy caterpillars, each with a light colored, spotted stripe along its body. Small, shiny black egg masses encircling twigs during winter.     Chemically treat or remove webs on cool or rainy days, when caterpillars are most likely to be within. Effective pesticides, such as Sevin, may be applied either to web or foliage. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Elm Bark Beetle

	Elm Bark Beetle
    Very small, round holes in the bark. Galleries formed in the inner bark and outer sapwood. Each "gallery" contains a small, central "parent" gallery. Initial symptoms of Dutch elm disease include wilting and yellowing of foliage followed by heavy defoliation. Very severe cases can result in tree death in as little as one year.     Maintain tree health by providing adequate moisture and nutrients. Elm bark beetles prefer to attack weakened, less vigorous trees. Remove dead or decayed parts of elm trees, since these are the most vulnerable to insect attacks. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 16 lbs. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre. Applications should thoroughly cover all bark surfaces on the tree trunk, limbs and twigs, using approximately 20 to 30 gallons of spray mixture per 50 square feet of elm tree.

Elm Leaf Beetle

	Elm Leaf Beetle
    Holes chewed in the underside of leaves by larvae that are green to yellow, with two black stripes along the back of their body. Leaves die and drop prematurely. Small holes chewed entirely through leaves by adult beetles. These pests, which especially like to feed on new growth, are olive green with a black stripe along the margin of each wing cover.     Remove wood piles and other debris on the ground to minimize the beetle's overwintering habit. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Fall Webworm

	Fall Webworm
    Silky webs built around the tips of branches during the summer or fall. This helps to distinguish the pest from the tent caterpillar, which builds its web in the crotches of branches during the spring. Appearance of hairy, light tan caterpillars. Skeletonization of leaves and defoliation of affected trees.     Remove webs by pruning affected branch tips. Be sure to destroy webs and enclosed eggs. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Gypsy Moth

	Gypsy Moth
    Defoliation resulting in loss of vigor and slowed growth. Small holes chewed in leaves by young larvae. Older larvae skeletonize leaves. Tree may be entirely defoliated.     Destroy egg masses before they hatch. Larvae crawling down trees at night will seek shelter beneath bands of burlap wrapped around the base of the tree. Examine the burlap each morning, and destroy any larvae found there. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to .75 to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Japanese Beetle

	Japanese Beetle
    Leaves are skeletonized by shiny green-metallic beetles with tiny tufts of white hair along each side of abdomen. Leaves may turn brown and die.     Vigorously shake small trees and shrubs early in the morning when beetles are sluggish. Place a plastic sheet on the ground so the fallen beetles can be captured and destroyed. Apply insect repellents to shoes and socks. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre. Note: use of pheromone traps to collect adults has not been shown to be effective in controlling Japanese Beetles, according to researchers. In fact, these traps may become counterproductive by luring the beetles into the home lawn environment.

Lace Bug

	Lace Bug
    Appearance of grayish adult bugs with broad, flat, transparent, lace-like wing covers. Found on the undersides of leaves, these adults leave behind specks of sticky, dark brown excrement called honeydew. Appearance of tiny, very dark nymphs that are covered with spines. These are found on the undersides of leaves. Affected leaves have tiny chlorotic (lightened, gray) spots on the upper surfaces and may fall from the trees.     Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre. For applications with Sevin dust, refer to the product label.

Pine Bark Beetle

	Pine Bark Beetle
    Pine needle color gradually changes from green to deep reddish-brown, with the needles eventually falling off. Presence of pitch tubes, which are composed of pine resins that ooze out of the pests' entry holes in the tree trunks. Boring dust (frass) in bark crevices and on the ground at the base of the tree. A few weeks after infestation, fungi carried by the beetles will often stain the wood beneath the bark a blue color.     Maintain healthy trees by ensuring that they have sufficient amounts of water and nutrients. Prune away injured or dead branches. Apply Sevin insecticide as a preventative treatment in May or June, prior to beetle attack. Apply at a rate equivalent to 16 lbs. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre. Application should be made to tree trunks from ground level upward until trunk diameter is less than 5 inches.

Spruce Budworm

	Spruce Budworm
  Branch tips have been stripped of needles. Severed needles--which turn brownish-red--are attached to branch tips by silken threads. When viewed from a distance, affected trees look as though they were scorched by fire. The tops of trees are generally affected first.     Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 to 2 lbs. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre.

Tussock Moth

	Tussock Moth
    Small holes chewed in leaves by young larvae. Leaves are skeletonized by mature caterpillars that have bunches of upright tufts of hairs extending from their body. Appearance of beige or grayish-white, cocoon-like overwintering structures with white egg masses attached.     Remove and destroy overwintering egg masses. Apply Sevin insecticide at a rate equivalent to 1 lb. a.i. (active ingredient) per acre. For applications with Sevin dust, refer to the product label.